Heidi’s Studio Sale!

 

Sometime last year, Christine mentioned in a blog post that we all have treasures in our studios that we want to sell. We thought it would be fun to do it through our Artistic Alchemy Blog.

All prices include first-class (if the package is under 13 ounces) or Priority postage (it depends on the item(s) and their weight). If you decide to buy several items, I’ll consolidate the order and hopefully be able to refund some of the total postage cost.

How do you purchase something? Email me personally, at hmemmett@gmail.com not through our AA blog. I’ll send you a Request for Money through Pay Pal. You don’t need a Pay Pal account to do this transaction. Once you pay, I will send it. Or, if you would rather, send me a check. The first person to email me that they want an item, gets it. That simple.

Everyone’s computer sees color differently. So keep that in mind. If you purchase something from me and don’t like it, I will take it back within 10 days of shipping it originally. I will refund your money after I receive the item back. I will not be able to refund any shipping charges  Here we go:

I collected some Kimono’s. They are timeless and look great for any occasion. I found that true Kimono’s are just not my thing. I am ashamed to say that I thought of cutting them up for the fabric. WHAT WAS I THINKING? So having saved them from my scissors, I now offer them to all of you. As items sell, they will be removed from the post.

Yellow Green kimono lined in a leaf print.  100% silk. Shibori is the dying technique. Beautifully hand sewn. Width from sleeve edge to middle of the back neck = 25″. Bust area (front pieces meeting= 40″. Hips with front pieces meeting= 42″. Finished length, measuring from the top of the collar to the bottom edge= 30 1/4″. Price: $35.00 plus $12.95 shipping. 

Cream with Shibori dyed Dark Green, Blue Green & Umber Circles & Mtns. 100% silk. So much detail in the Shibori. Beautifully hand sewn. Width from sleeve edge to middle of the back neck = 25″. Bust area (front pieces meeting)= 21″. Hips with front pieces meeting = 42″. Finished length, measuring from the top of the collar to the bottom edge= 33 1/4″. Price: $35.00 plus $12.95 shipping.

Fuchsia kimono has sold!

 

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“Off The Cuff” and “How to Keep a Man Close,” and that’s only Day 1.

by Heidi Emmett

Our “REVEAL” for Artistic Alchemy, September 3rd-7th, 2018 is coming in February.This is my week and I wanted you to see what I’m thinking of doing for the Heidi Emmett workshop in which we’ll be creating “Wearable Art.” We have three full days of sewing time. Friday, the last day, has 2 hours (9-11a.m.). These are thoughts for my workshop only.

The first day I want to devote to upcycling! It is so much fun and a great way to loosen up your creative skills for your pattern project for days 2 & 3. So it’s, “Off The Cuff” or “How to Keep a Man Close.” Choose one, or if you’re fast, create both! Below, are some in process, Off The Cuff, and “How to Keep a Man close projects.

Following the Upcycling projects- just a few of the patterns you can choose from in the “Pick a Pattern” portion. Visit: Designsbyheidi.wordpress.com for a complete line up.

Below Pick a Pattern, see some possibilities for our final few hours together on Friday.

Also, Christine had mentioned all of us selling some of our precious, but accumulating to the max, “stuff.” I’m the first one up for 2018. I have to post my goodies in a separate post today. So look for it shortly after this posting (Issues with WordPress, grrrr..).

How to keep a Man Close, starts with what else, a man’s shirt! That first cut is always the hardest.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Part Two of My Semi Annual Shot of Inspiration

The fall post of my sewing retreat promised photos of clothing created by some of the participants. As was mentioned, the tables are full of yardage and remnants coaxing those who are extremely clever to put them to use. Helen is one of those who has no fear. She bravely goes where no sewist has gone before and emerges as the queen of creativity. I should have a Pinterest board just titled “Helen”. She has repeatedly demonstrated how to recycle clothing in the most unique ways. Here are some of her delightful creations.

Keep in mind that some of the garments in the following pictures are in various stages of being finished.

There is a love/fascination with deconstructed jeans over the last year. Helen and her daughter jump right in and make the most if it.

Its so much fun to have Helen and her two daughters with us. Below is a jacket that Alex is working on. It’s great to see the similarities and differences in their work.

It was Helen who introduced us to piecing thrift store t-shirts together. My sister, Patty, has made several but her latest is her “cocktail hour” t-shirt. After collecting an assortment of blingy shirts, she amazed us with this one. Perfect for happy hour.

Terry is another accomplished sewist. Having taugh Home Ec for many years, she sews at the speed of light and has mastered the pieced t-shirt. Her work is always executed with perfection.

The following tunic was made from two men’s sweatshirts. Looks cozy, eh?

Our group is honored to have such a thoughtful, contemplative sewist as Gwen. She leaves her sewing machine behind and brings handwork for us to drool over. She has mastered hand stitched embellishments on scarves and shawls, a staple in her wardrobe.

Some painted polka dots, some cut out, layered with another fabric and hand stitched. It’s beautiful and drapes wonderfully. Oh such patience!

JM started this piece when we arrived. It was a smallish piece of hand stencilled fabric that she was hand stitching onto a jacket. Oh how I wish I’d taken another photo at the end of our week. It was just so clever and yet so simple, something that I strive for in my work.

Janet was inspired by the wildlife on a recent trip to Africa. I am impressed by anyone who takes on thread painting. Nice work, Janet.

While Kay won the “lottery” for this dress, the woven piece she was creating was fascinating to study.

Vicky always amazes us with something extremely beautiful and thoughtfully engineered.

Annie came to us with just the basic sewing skills. She knocked our socks off this year with this stinking cute, adorable tunic top. Then she revealed that she has been taking sewing lessons! I think she could teach us a thing or two.Such nice work, Annie. And here she is modeling Janet’s purchased green crinkly vest. We loved the wonkyness of this with its asymmetry and tucks. A huge thanks to Jenny who worked to get this pattern copied while at the retreat. Although I made it from similar fabric when I got home, it’s that green color that really gives this vest it’s personality. The pattern is available from Jenny. It’s called Janet’s Green Vest!I hope this post leaves you with some inspiration for the new year. Do you have some creative goals?  Have you thought about how you will achieve them? Will you teach a new technique to an eager student? Will you finally take that class or retreat you’ve been putting off? Whatever it is, I hope it’s realized in a way that brings you joy and and a sense of accomplishment.

My “Foliage Bag”

by Christine Barnes

How can 2017 be almost over?! Where did all that time go? And why didn’t I get more done? This girl just wants to sew. Well, after the retreat in September, I managed to fit in a project that’s been on my want-to-do list for some time, a collage and surface-stitched bag, similar in concept to the surface-stitched vests I love to make.

So I was off and running with my “Foliage” bag. Don’t ask me why I chose that name—I have no idea. The “ingredients” included Marcia Derse prints, batiks, and—of course—a Kaffe Fassett stripe. (A few other fabrics that made it into the finished bag aren’t shown below.) Notice that the fabrics vary in 1) color, 2) the style of the designs, and 3) the degree of openness or density. Because surface stitching blends patterns and colors, it’s best to err on the side of more contrast rather than less.The collage is created on a foundation of all-cotton muslin and all-cotton osnaburg, a slightly nubby, old-fashioned needlework fabric. (I make sure neither fabric is labeled “wrinkle resistant”—you want your bag to become crinkly.) I prewash the osnaburg because it shrinks so much, but not the muslin or the fabrics for the collage.

Here’s how it works: I cut straight-edge pieces that are not perfectly square or rectangular. (I have yet to do a collage with curved pieces. One of these days.) Trapezoids like the ones shown here are great shapes for collage—they’re a bit quirky, and quirky is good in my book.I add some longer, slender shapes, and a few pieces with “chunks” cut out of them. Here are some of the pieces I started with, separated so you can see the variety in size and shape.I begin to arrange the pieces on the osnaburg/muslin foundation, just to get a feel for how the colors and patterns will look in each other’s company. Keep in mind that nothing is settled at this point. (The brick-and-gray stripe on the left was edited out early on. 🙂I layer the pieces so that some are over and some are under adjoining pieces, with no gaps.I especially like a “spinning” arrangement, where three pieces overlap like this:It’s getting there . . .Just when you think you can’t mess with it another minute (and believe me, that happens), it all comes together. The next step is to use little dots of glue and pins to tack down the pieces at their edges, followed by a zigzag stitch to secure them. The zig-zagging is tedious, but it’s well worth the effort; you don’t want any pieces flopping around.

With everything “nailed down,” I stitch a wavy grid in both directions using variegated thread and eyeballing the spacing between the lines. That’s the beauty of surface stitching—perfection is not required, or even desired. Just have fun with it!A closer look at the stitched grid. After this step, I stitch all over in wavy lines in all directions until it feels like one piece of fabric, then wash, dry, and cut out my bag. Here’s one side of my finished bag, with its “boxed” bottom. (The light was very different, very cool, the day I took these shots.)I chose a back-and-white stripe for the lining to make a strong contrast and a visual connection to the black straps. A narrow strip of the Kaffe Fassett stripe finishes the upper edge and ties the colors together.The other side of the bag. The light was unusually warm the morning I took this shot, so the color isn’t that accurate, but wow, it sure is luminous!Finally, why is it that our unseen work (the bottom of the bag here) is sometimes our favorite part???If you’d like more info about the collage process and construction of my bag, check out my next “Color Connection” newsletter in early January. If you don’t already receive it, you can sign up on the Home page of my website. In the Gallery and Store on my site you can also see my raw-edge, surface-stitched vests and their patterns.

Changing gears, you’ve seen these blocks at various stages, and here’s the finished quilt, titled “Composite Circles, Random Dots.”Sandra did my favorite quilting, wavy vertical lines. I love, love it. Mega thanks, SB!With that I wish you warm and comfy holidays, surrounded by the things that enchant you and the people you love!

 

 

 

 

 

A Post of Potpourri

by Sandra Bruce

Following is my “potpourri” of a post. I can hardly believe we’re into December. Wow, wow, wow! It’s been a few weeks since my last post…. where does the time go?

A fairly clean studio!!! How did THAT happen?

Fall came to Grass Valley in such beauty this year, the trees were even more intensely colored than usual, it seemed to me. I always see the first Fall color in the parking lot behind my long-arm studio downtown. The maples there start to change early.

And then the first rain, or two…such a wonderful sound to wake up to….that soft pitter-patter. The view from my home studio, shiny with rain, always makes me smile. The fire season could not have been over soon enough.

May I digress for a moment. Many of you know whether or not I am in my long-arm studio downtown by the presence of my car sitting in my parking space. I now have a new space, on the other side of the lot, closer to my building. You’re always welcome to stop by!

A couple of quilt show notations: My quilt “Lemon Tree in Tuscany” will be in a regional SAQA show (Studio Arts Quilt Associates) opening in Santa Monica on December 9th, at the California Heritage Museum, until March 18th, 2018.

I wish I could attend the opening, but unfortunately I won’t be able to. I am feverishly finishing up customer quilts that need to be done for Christmas! Here’s the announcement, in case you are in Southern California:

Also in show news, “Zahra, Age 5, Syrian Refugee” came to PIQF with the Threads of Resistance exhibit in October in Santa Clara. Since it was my only opportunity to see it during its 2-year national tour I went to see it. I really enjoyed seeing the quilts in person, and getting a group picture with the other quilters from Northern California in the exhibit. “Zahra” is in good company! And PIQF was a great show, as usual. PS: I am wearing one of Mary Boalt’s fabulous creations, a blouse she made from tea towels. Only Mary!

My latest Matrix quilt, entitled “Summertime”, is from a photo by Suzanne Semnacher. I started it at the beginning of summer, but it languished on my design wall for the entire season until I had time in the fall to finish it. Finally! Here’s the original photo, and then the quilt. You can see that I took some liberties with the colors. I think it was a great composition to work from.

I’ve been doing quite a bit of teaching, but I’m done for the year now, with the beginning of January my next gig in the Santa Cruz area. I’ve taught 2 workshops in Southern California, and several up north closer to home. At the meeting in Mission Viejo, CA I saw a wonderful Matrix quilt made by Angela Miller, a student I had last year in another guild, who brought her finished piece to Show and Tell. I love what she did. It’s so gratifying to see what people go on to make after taking my workshop. Nice job, Angela!

I’ve had a few gentlemen lately in my workshops, that is fantastic too!

And………..speaking of workshops, I’ve introduced my newest workshop, “The ABC’s of Stitching Words”. This is a one-day class where the basics of stitching words with a home machine is explored. Having had a 30+year career in commercial lettering (and illustration) has given me a good foundation for how to do this, and I do quite a bit of “writing” into my customers’ quilts. Connecting words, dotting “I”s and crossing “t”s, I cover it all. There are so many possibilities for incorporating words into quilts, also……making labels, fabric postcards, wall-hangings, etc.  I’m excited to have this new offering, and will be doing a demo in January with NCQC’s “Demo Day”.

Below is Cathy Stone, who has taught me so much in her classes, who took my class in stitching words. She is moving from the area and we are going to miss her!

Also, while on the subject of teaching….I have added a 3rd possible project for a Matrix workshop, along with the “Wake Up Cup” and “Sew Ready” (pincushion) projects. I have created an abbreviated version of Mr. Cardinal, as seen below. I call it “Junior Cardinal”, and will be teaching it in January for the first time. AND… NOTE! I will be teaching my Material Matrix technique next year at our Zephyr Retreat in September, and I already have 3 interested ladies. We will be announcing all the pertinent information early in 2018, keep an eye out on this blog.

I’ve been busy as usual with customer quilting on my long-arm. I am constantly delighted at what my customer come up with for me to create, as with this beautiful batik quilt I did recently for someone.

Totally out of my usual “box”, I am working on a Halloween quilt that will hopefully be done for next Halloween. It is from a pattern by The Vintage Spool, which I spotted at a booth at PIQF. I love doing hand work so a quilt chock-full of hand-applique is just the thing to keep my hands busy on the cold winter nights ahead of us. Here is just one block I have completed, it is really a wonderful design. I can’t keep from adjusting it, though, to suit my own tastes and sense of humor. I will have so much fun quilting it, and it will be a nice “quilting sample”.

Not to forget polymer in my list of what I’ve been doing! Surprisingly, almost every pair in the photo below has been sold, and my inventory is LOW. I had hoped to put polymer into this post to sell, but I’ll wait until my next post when I’ve had a chance to really turn out a good batch. It will include pins, buttons, and earrings.

My last photo, below, is from the holiday season 2 years ago. My friends were at my house and we were creating prayer flags. I had 2 weeks before fallen and broken my scapula, but despite this managed to sew something! Neither sleet nor rain……                                                  I wish for you all a happy December, in whatever way you celebrate it (or not), and hopes for a 2018 that will bring some peace and positivity to our world.

It’s a Late Fall Day….

by Heidi Emmett

Welcome to all who our new Artistic Alchemy blog sign ups! Check out my bio on the home page. I am the “Art to Wear” workshop teacher when you come to our retreat in September at Zephyr Point, Lake Tahoe.

Below is a picture that my friend Sara (who LIVES at Zephyr Point) took from her living room window. Can you even believe how gorgeous this is? The hot air balloon was just inflated and is sitting on the barge that follows the balloon around Lake Tahoe.

I am working on what my workshop will be for 2018. It will be Art to Wear,of course, but exactly what…. still sewing, planning…. I enjoy creating so many things that all relate to the Art to Wear Theme.

Upcycling is soooo popular.  I want to show you one simple upcycling thing you could do today.

Yesterday was the perfect day to stay indoors. Here in Cedar Ridge, CA , we received 6 inches of rain. On days like that, I have to wear “Cozy Clothes.”  Below is what I picked. I made this pullover hoody with kangaroo pockets in 1989! Yes, 1989. I had Heidi’s Fabrics then and I could not keep PolarTec in stock during the fall and winter. “Polar Fleece” fabrics were created by Malden Mills out of Massachusetts. They are the company that started the Fleece craze. They had the BEST quality fleece on the market. At least 4 weights, 6 types, stunning prints, solids, and never EVER pilled. So sad, the mill burned to the ground in 1995 and as so many textile mills in the USA, gone for good. 

I used a Kwik Sew pattern. Oh my gosh, I just added up the years, and I have kept it for 28 years! It has truly been my “go to” cozy, comfy, feel better, pullover. All the other cozy clothes I own, and I keep pulling out this one.Who knew?  I’m certain that YOU own some cozy clothes too. Look at a new piece with the eye to, “Can I upcycle this garment? (make certain to use one that is an Extra Large and Roomy for the best “Cozy” factor) to make it your new, go to, Cozy piece.

Here’s mine. Ha, ha,in fact,  I’m WEARING it as I write my post today. I found a Tommy Bahama, mens X LG , super quality French terry- like, cotton knit.  

Most important for me, a kangaroo pocket. I used Marcia Derse fabrics and used a super light weight batting (to show off the quilting), small amounts of all my fav’s so I can wear any color turtle neck underneath. I purposely lined the simple rectangle pocket (take a pattern from one you already have) with muslin, and wanted it to show as I am rolling up the sleeves. I stitched the K.P. down the middle and a few inches up the side openings so my chocolate stash or whatever, won’t fall out.

I added extra little pieces here and there, one on the back, and one on the front, to tie the whole thing together.

I’m feeling so cozy right now, excuse me while I go make a cup of coffee and have a piece of pumpkin pie. Be right back……

Ohh THAT was yummy. Since I spoke about Marcia Derse fabrics (check out her website of the same name, or go to Ebay for older prints), I want you to see the Terrific Tabard vest I made out of this panel fabric, one of the few panels she has created. 

Email me: hmemmett@gmail.com if you are interested in purchasing this Art to Wear vest sewing pattern. I will mail it to you for $16.00 (includes tax and shipping).

A little bit more on creativity and how meeting as a group or in a workshop is so inspiring. I belong to a group called SWAG (Sierra Wearable Art Group).My brain starts churning out so many different ideas when I’m there and I scramble to write them down.  What I want to do for you in the next workshop I teach at Zephyr Point is: Let’s think outside the box together and create a unique piece of Art to Wear that will fit and you will want to wear.

Here is a sampling from our last meeting: 

Patty P. first made a dress from this DROP DEAD GORGEOUS (super expensive but worth every penny) wool fabric she purchased at Britex Fabrics. She didn’t care for the dress, so she cut it up again and re-purposed it into this stunning vest. She loves it now.

Joan C. is at it again with her great fiber jewelry. Stunning what pieces of silk from silk scarves will do to make a great look. How about those old scarves you can’t bear to get rid of but you just don’t wear anymore, hmmm…. 

The beginnings of my fall set up on my front steps. Can you spy the fake pumpkin? There is one in this picture. In fact, when Thanksgiving gives way to Christmas, and “fake” pumpkins go on sale, I buy. I mix them in with the real deal to make for a stunning (in my humble opinion, ha, ha) display. With the real pumpkins, no matter how hard I try to pick the best, I will have a casualty now and then. Pumpkin mush is a mess to clean off  brick steps. I spy the fake pumpkin, it’s the little white one. I used a felt pen to make a more realistic stem. Isn’t the large red orange pumpkin gorgeous? These are called “heirloom pumpkins.”

Chinese lanterns picked at their peak. Will add these to my Thanksgiving table. 

A Red maple with sunlight coming from the back. Stunning!

Thank you so much for stopping by everyone. Don’t forget to visit my personal blog, an all things creative blog: Designsbyheidi.wordpress.com  Have a Happy Thanksgiving. We all have much to be Thankful for. Hugs, Heidi

 

 

 

 

 

My Semi Yearly Shot of Inspiration Fall 2017 Part 1

 

Having just returned from what is now my semi annual sewing retreat with my tribe of like minded sewists, my mind is full of new ideas and my cabinets have a whole boat load of new fabric in them. Because we have so much fun, share so many wonderful garments and jewelry creations, and infuse each other with fresh ideas, another retreat was added last March. Yay!!!!!!!! Twice a year now!

Although it’s only been seven months since our last retreat, the racks and tables were as full as ever. Here’s just one of the things we look forward to: everyone is invited to bring fabric and/or garments to give away or sell. On Sunday night after check in, we “shop” the garment racks and put our name on the tags of items we would like to buy. If more than one person has their name on the tag, a drawing is held the next night. After dinner, we all gather in the large sewing room in eager anticipation and then applaud the winners good fortune. Here are some of the racks of clothes. Shoes, belts, scarves, etc. also are offered.

And yes, Terry got the Kantha cloth coat she is admiring. It’s reversible! And it looks adorable on her.

The “freebie” table includes all manner of fabric. Scraps, patterns, yardage, patterns, decorator samples, patterns, vintage linens, patterns, old clothing, patterns, a huge container of old buttons, patterns, and then there were some more patterns! One participant moved this year and decided to thin out her collection of patterns. It was divine! Thanks Sharon!

That little corded basket was part of the gift exchange this year and it worked perfectly for gathering a stash of buttons.

Since there is no copyright on clothing, we spend quite a bit of time tracing off garments. What we can’t accomplish on our own, lovely Jenny makes the patterns for us (and anyone else who wants them). These are some of the ones I considered ordering from the box. It probably represents about a quarter of what’s available. And after last week, there will be about five more coming. Thank you Jenny.

Thanks to Janet, this was another year to enjoy her offbeat jewelry making. She uses everything from rubber bands to fabric covered wire to hair ties.

My sister and myself.

These are fabric covered wire balls/flowers. They can be manipulated into whatever shape you’d like.

Aren’t these the cutest lime green rubber bands?

The following picture is a necklace made of rubber bands and three great beads. My sister and I saw the same exact necklace MINUS the beautiful beads in a high end boutique in Berkeley for 79.00!

Who doesn’t like a black and white mix of patterns?

Lisa brought some huge rusty pipes along with some smaller rusted items, a big spray bottle with vinegar and some plastic tarps so we could try our hand at rust dying. No tetanus shots required. It was so simple and because it was quite warm, we got quick results. Terry’s shirt is a good example. Does her husband know that he “donated” that? 

Isn’t that yoke awesome?

It’s really appreciated when ones who have taken classes during the year share the results of what they’ve learned. Although eco dying has been featured before, I thought this was such a beautiful example and Lisa used the best part of it in this knit t-shirt.

This is just so beautiful. It looks 3D.

A huge thanks to Gayle who took a marbling class from a  “Master Marbler”. Who knew there was such a thing. She said that after following the teachers old world technique, she broke out her own esthetic. I love this. The colors, the large print, the garment, the asymmetry. It just looks like the person wearing it is having way more fun than I am.

In my next blog I will share with you some of the wonderfully creative garments that were made while we were there, some made straight from the scrap table! Stay tuned for Part Two in my next blog.

The last pictures are before and after pictures of Victoria’s painted canvas that she made while at Zephyr.  I love what she did with it after she returned home. Please excuse the blurry pictures.

Such a clever idea for a fabric container. Nice work, Victoria. Couldn’t you just see a few of these in your creative space?

Wishing you all fresh sources of inspiration whether it be rust, wire or rubber bands. Carry on and create!