About

Mary Boalt

mary-boaltMy mother taught me to sew as a young girl and, after receiving a sewing machine as a wedding gift, I have never stopped sewing.  My interest turned to wearable art about twenty five years ago. I enjoyed creating one-of-a-kind vests and jackets for boutiques in Northern California for ten years. I also taught classes including ribbon weaving, projects using soluble stabilizers and painting on Steam-a-Seam. Every kind of hand applied embellishment captures my attention and imagination.  Recently I have begun painting on canvas in a modern and abstract way using stencils, stamps, screen prints and whatever else I can get my hands on.  Like fabric embellishment, the possibilities with painting are endless.
Email:  squeakypieces@gmail.com
Pinterest:  www.pinterest.com/maryboalt

Christine Barnes

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I love thinking about, working with, and teaching color! Degrees in design and journalism led to a career as a free-lance writer of decorating and remodeling books for Sunset. I wrote about color for the home then, but my real passion has always been color and design in quilts. Join me at Zephyr to learn all about color–and how it can help you to create quilts you love!

I’m the author of The Quilter’s Color Club (C&T) and articles for McCall’s Quilting, American Patchwork & Quilting, American Quilter, and Modern Patchwork. I live in Grass Valley, CA, where I sew in a light-filled room, surrounded by fabrics I love.

Sandra Bruce

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I have combined my 30+ years as an illustrator and letterer with my passion for quilting, wearable art, and polymer clay. Being predominantly left-handed and right-brained makes for a different take on combining tools, mediums, and design to make something unique. I teach both quilt and polymer clay workshops, they are equally fun and expressive! See the links below for more information and photos.

Heidi Emmett

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As a young girl it was simple Barbie clothes and fashion shows with blankets for gowns. As a teenager I began a 25-year career in all things fabric, with 16 years as the owner of a full-service fabric store. I have come full circle and feel blessed to be able to create clothing patterns, re-purposed garments, and accessories that are easy to sew and fun to wear. Piece them, quilt them, bead them, felt them—the possibilities are endless.I’m always working on my next pattern as well as projects for quilting and crafting magazines.

Recent Posts

Destination: Transparency!

by Christine Barnes

The past month has been a whirlwind of travel, but gosh, it has been FUN. I’m calling it my California Coastal Color Tour because I taught a different workshop for guilds in San Diego, Arroyo Grande, and Santa Cruz. For this post I’d like to show you what twenty diligent (and cheerfully rowdy) Santa Cruz students did with my “Transparent Circles” pattern. The original quilt, made of shot cottons and Marcia Derse prints:I refer to this kind of transparency as “layered,” which is different from parent/child transparency. Here’s an overview of how I make the blocks, using the upper left block in the quilt as an example.

I piece four smaller squares of light fabrics and four larger squares of corresponding dark fabrics. Using the template below, I cut out a freezer-paper circle (double layer, for stability) and mark each quarter line with a small slit. I then trim the light unit of squares a scant ¼ inch beyond the freezer-paper circle and press the raw edge over and onto the shiny side of the paper. Finally, I appliqué the circle to the larger pieced unit, lining up the seams, and cut away and remove the paper from the back.You make “in and out” blocks, using the same eight fabrics. I love seeing how different the block looks with the light and dark fabrics reversed.

Circles in progress . . . .Brenda’s blocks, with help from Lori. Notice that the colors are in the same location in each block. So cool!What fun to see some of the different blocks. Happy students, successful circles. That’s my traveling buddy Kari toward the back.Meryl (my facilitator for the trip—thank you so much) with her first block. The dark green and orange Grunge fabrics give the block a lovely texture.

Could there be a cuter picture? Pat, my hostess (we loved staying with you!) and her blocks made of Gelato ombrés. She’s the first to try Gelatos for these blocks, and I think they are awesome.

The next day we had breakfast at the home of a local wearable artist. I way taken by the arrangement and color of these elements in her courtyard.Pat and Lori then took us to Back Porch Fabrics in Pacific Grove, a wonderful, must-visit shop on the corner of Grand and Central streets. Who can forget that location?We were in for one more treat the morning we left, Gayle’s bakery, a Santa Cruz landmark and a feast for the eyes and the palette. If you aren’t hungry when you go, you will be when you look at the array of pastries and goodies!Owner Gayle Ortiz did the picassiette (broken pottery mosaic) on some of the tables, as well as one wall.

I don’t know about you, but I see a fabric design in this . . . .We headed home, with new memories, friends, and fabrics. And as often happens after I teach a class, I want to make the quilt again, this time with Grunges and Peppered Cottons. Thanks so much for tuning in this week. For my next post I’ll have tales to tell from another coast—the coast of Florida!

 

 

 

 

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